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You know when you are just looking to fill your kitchen or your home with that smell of fresh-baked bread?   However, the idea of waiting for the double-rise and then kneading bread dough just aren’t fitting into your Sunday?  Beer bread is just the ticket.  Quite simply…almost instant gratification in the bread making area. 

A day or two ago I bought fresh chives to top some baked potatoes and it seems so wasteful to me to spend $3 on fresh herbs just to let them turn into green mush at the bottom of the vegetable drawer.  On a side note: I’m counting the days until our last frost so I can start growing herbs in our backyard garden again summer.

I wandered over to the grocery store to pick up a block of cheddar since it’s so much better when you freshly grate it. All of the other ingredients were in the pantry (except the beer) and I just love to pull from a well-stocked pantry so I can whip something up without a lot of fuss. This is one of those recipes.

You can adapt the flavor of basic beer bread into basically anything simply by changing the add-ins like fresh herbs and different grated cheeses.  You can find another beer bread recipe here on my blog.  By the way, for you novice beer bread bakers out there, if you omit herbs and cheese you’ve got yourself a 4 ingredient recipe.  And, you’ll still get a delicious loaf of bread right straight from your oven.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cheddar and Chive Beer Bread

Ingredients

3 cups self-rising flour

scant 1/2 cup sugar

2 tbsp chopped, fresh chives

3/4 cup shredded sharp Cheddar cheese

1 12-ounce bottle of beer (I used Heineken Light)*

1/4 cup unsalted butter, melted

Method

Stir together first 5 ingredients; pour into a lightly greased 9 x 5 inche loaf pan.  Bake at 350 degrees for 45 minutes.  Remove loaf pan from oven and pour melted butter over top. (Do this slowly so that your melted butter stays on top of your loaf and doesn’t spill out onto your stove top).  Bake 10 additional minutes.

*You can also substitute non-alcoholic beer.

Kitchen note:  This recipe was adapted from Southern Living.

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