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provencal stuffed tomatoes

Cameras can be troublesome, can’t they?

A few weeks back my Panasonic Lumix wouldn’t focus properly or zoom in.

And, while you may be nodding your head that you’ve been there yourself, you may also be wondering if my camera is a DLSR.

No, it’s not.  I’m still a point and shoot kind of gal.

Or in the case of these Provencal stuffed tomatoes, I’m an iPhone kind of gal.

Yes, my trusty iPhone camera to the rescue.  In fact, my next several posts will be taken with my iPhone.

Thank you for bearing with me as I get through this little camera hurdle and work on how to fix it via message boards and YouTube tutorials.  Fingers crossed.

In the meantime, there are tomatoes to talk about.

As I mentioned yesterday, our garden tomatoes haven’t been the best this summer.  A few handfuls at most.

Luckily, I found these pretty ones at Trader Joes and this recipe came together one afternoon.

provencal tomatoesIf you haven’t used your food processor in awhile, here’s a great opportunity to dust if off so you can make fresh breadcrumbs to go along with the red onion, fresh basil, minced garlic, fresh thyme, parsley and Kosher salt.  These ingredients will form the stuffing.

At this point, your kitchen will smell wonderful and you’ll be ready to stuff each tomato half.

Did I mention you’ll need 6 tomatoes, cut in half and cored?  I don’t think I did.

provencal tomatoes

Here’s a peek after they’ve come out of your oven. They’ll bake in a 400 degree oven for about 15 minutes.  At that point, sprinkle with cheese, drizzle with olive oil and bake another 30 seconds.

provencal tomatoes

I made a couple of minor adjustments to the original recipe simply because I didn’t have a few of the ingredients called for.

I used red onion in place of scallions.  I also used a combination of Parmiagiano Reggiano and Pecorino Romano to top the tomatoes in place of Gruyere cheese (though the next time I make these, I will try them with the Gruyere).

I think it’s important to note that I don’t typically mess with a Barefoot Contessa recipe.  They’re just too good.

I almost forgot to tell you that I had a couple of tomatoes that did not get eaten. I think you can guess who wouldn’t touch them.

The next day I cut them up and tossed them with hot, cooked pasta.  Delicious!

You can find the original recipe here.  It is from Ina Garten’s book, Barefoot Contessa Family Style.

Allison

 

 

 

 

 

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